My Dog Lucy

My Dog Lucy

Lucy is just over a year old. When she was born she was sooo tiny. In fact, of the six puppies we had from that litter, she was about 4 times smaller than the rest of them. We believe that she was deprived of oxygen in the womb.

She is almost completely blind, partially deaf, and she is unable to bark. The sound she makes is more like a low rumble or growl. Kinda of like a “roo, roo” sound. And, her nose doesn’t work. She can’t really smell.

I don’t know if you can see her right eye (your left) has a splotch of white and blue on the lower half of her iris. There are lots of times that she will run into things that are unexpectedly in her path – especially if its dark or dimly lit.

I figured out she couldn’t smell when she was little and I would toss her a treat and it would fall to the ground and she couldn’t find it. The other dogs would grab her food. I learned to break up her treats into bite size pieces and put it directly into her mouth because if it was too big she would drop it and that would be that. She’s unable to catch food you toss to her like my other dogs.

She’s mentally challenged, too. We have not been able to train her to do anything except sit. She’s also afraid of pretty much everything. Literally.

Bless her heart. We love her. Isn’t she cute?

So, a few months ago, she started foaming at the mouth and throwing up. I mean, really foaming at the mouth. Lots and lots of foamy slobber. This was not normal for her. We had been waiting for the next rabies clinic to come so she could get her shots. And suddenly I was very worried that she had rabies. You see, a couple of weeks before she’d caught and killed a rat in the middle of the afternoon and the rat got her on the nose.

We had five dogs at the time, and our neighbor dog spends most of the day in my yard. No one else was showing symptoms, so I assumed the worst. Rabies.

Of course, if I were to take her into a vet, the only way they can determine if an animal has rabies is to look at the brain. So, I decided to lock her up and keep her away from the other animals and children.

Now, I never had an official diagnosis, but she was definitely sick. Here’s how I cured her:

For over a week, three times a day I gave her 1 – 2 tablespoons of Colloidal Silver and three times a day (alternating) I put 1 tablespoon of activated charcoal mixed in with some broth.

Finally the foaming stopped. She stopped acting weird (for her). And she was back to her normal weird self.

About Melissa

Melissa Ringstaff is a pastor's wife, serving with her husband in the beautiful Appalachian Mountains of Southeastern Kentucky. She is a homeschooling mother of five plus four and Grandarlin' to 13 (so far) grandchildren. Melissa is the Founding Editor of A Virtuous Woman since 2001. She has written several titles including Spring Cleaning for the Heart and Home, The Homemaker's Journal: Keeping House, and Christian ADVENTures in Prophecy. You are invited to visit Melissa at A Virtuous Woman.
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2 Responses to My Dog Lucy

  1. Kirsten says:

    God sends us “special needs” children – no matter if they have two or four legs. You’ve been, and still are a loving, caring and responsible mother – Keep up the good work. By the way, Lucy is as cute as a button :)

    • Melissa says:

      Kirsten, thank you! Lucy is a sweet heart. I have prayed over that dog sooo many times! I thank God that she is still with us despite all her “problems!”

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